• Case study

    Velib – a New Paris Love Affair

    November 4, 2011 Paris

    On 15 July 2007, Paris launched Vélib, a 24/7 cycle hire scheme that is changing the face of transport in Paris. By the end of 2007, a total of 20,600 cycles will be available for hire at 1451 stations around the city. In the first three months of operation there were 100,000 users daily, traveling 300,000 km, this translates to a 32,330 tCO2 reduction of emissions annually. Importantly Vélib is a viable economic story, the City of Paris will generate €34 million over the first 10 years of the project without investing a single cent. In exchange, the company which invested €80 million upfront, will pay operating costs plus €3.4 million annually to Paris for rights to advertising space, and is expected to generate around €60 million annually in advertising revenues.

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  • Case study

  • Case study

    London is the largest city to have adopted a central area congestion charging scheme. It has led to a 20% reduction in four-wheeled traffic within the charging zone during charging hours, cutting an estimated 40-50 million litres of vehicle fuel consumption inside the zone and a total 100,000 tons CO2 emissions annually across London. The charge raises £122 M annually which is then spent on improving transport, including providing more buses, improving road safety and implementing energy efficiency in transport. The zone was further extended in February 2007, doubling its size, with initial estimates showing a 13% reduction in traffic in the new area covered. Monitoring of this extended zone has not yet been completed.

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  • Case study

    In Copenhagen, cycling is considered a distinct traffic category with its own separate road area, on par with motor traffic and pedestrian traffic. As many as 50 % of Copenhagen residents who work or study in Copenhagen cycle to their workplace or educational institution.

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  • Case study

    Bogotá’s CicloRuta is one of the most extensive bicycle path networks in the world. It covers over 211 miles (340 km) and connects citizens to major BRT routes, parks, and community centers. The system is a best practice, not only because it has reduced car dependence and associated emissions, but it has also fundamentally changed behavior in the city – today (2007) 4% of the population use their bikes, an increased from 2% in 2000. The system is both unique and successful because its design took into consideration the topography of the city – the manmade and natural features, such as essential facilities, hills, waterways, and parklands – to create the best possible flow and function.

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